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Behind the story of 21Socks

As a boy, I lived under communism. You could learn a lot about communism through books, media, movies, or through your own experience.

Surely you know that the media was undemocratic and that everyone published the same news, everyone who was 18 had the right to vote, but they could only vote for one political party.


If you were born in 1982 or earlier, chances are that in the first grade of primary school, on the day of the former Yugoslavia, wearing a pioneer uniform - a blue "titovka" hat with a red five-pointed star, a white shirt with a red scarf and blue pants, you gave a pioneer oath:  Today, when I become a pioneer, I give the honorable pioneer word - that I will study and work diligently, respect parents and the elderly, and be a faithful and sincere companion, who holds a given word.

The story behind the old photo
If you were born in 1982 or earlier, chances are that in the first grade of primary school, on the day of the former Yugoslavia, wearing a pioneer uniform - a blue "titovka" hat with a red five-pointed star, a white shirt with a red scarf and blue pants, you gave a pioneer oath:

Today, when I become a pioneer,
I give the honorable pioneer word -
that I will study and work diligently,
respect parents and the elderly,
and be a faithful and sincere companion,
who holds a given word.

 

Under communism

There was the term "closed economy", which means that we could not buy products from other countries, but only products produced in our country.

However, we could not produce, for example, oil and coffee, so we imported it, but when the state did not have the money to import these products, then we could drive cars every other day, and we bought coffee in dots (the state determined how much coffee each the family can buy - drink).

As a boy, I didn't mind that there was no gasoline for cars and no coffee. What I missed the most were the colors.

Communism loved simplicity, unification, equality…

Every day at school we had to wear blue aprons, my mother (who worked in a textile factory) also had to wear a blue apron, and my father who worked in a factory that made trains was also, you guessed it, dressed in blue.

As a child, I used to get lost often in large neighborhoods full of tall skyscrapers that looked the same and were painted the same color.
I wanted to see other colors because they were a symbol of freedom, creativity, individuality for me… I think I was not aware of these concepts then, but I am very good at what I miss.

And here we come to sneakers and socks. My favorite sneakers were the ‘Shanghai’ (communist version of Convers All Star sneakers). The problem was that the ‘Shanghai’ sneakers were exclusively in white and blue color . (When I grew up I realized that regardless of the white color, they are much more comfortable than Conver All Star sneakers).



The socks my parents bought me were white, black, or gray. The socks worn by my parents were white, black or gray, the socks worn by my friends and their parents were white, black or gray.

Communism also had its good sides. He taught me that all people are worth the same regardless of skin color, material status, everyone is entitled to the same medical care, etc.…

All people are worth the same regardless of physical and mental characteristics because we are all first and foremost the inhabitants of this beautiful planet called Earth.

In the meantime, communism in my country has failed, and I grew up and decided to combine the best of communism and capitalism.

I started a business with socks and Inspired by life with Down syndrome I called it the 21Socks.

For those who do not know normally, a fertilized egg has 23 pairs of chromosomes. In most people with Down syndrome, there is an additional copy of chromosome 21 (also known as trisomy 21 due to the existence of three copies of chromosome instead of two), which leads to changes in the normal development of the body and brain.

My Down Syndrome Awareness Socks recognize the contributions, achievements, and struggles of people with Down Syndrome. We donate 10% of the sales of each pair of these socks to support Down syndrome.

You can buy socks anywhere, but buying these socks helps to raise awareness about Down syndrome.

People with Down syndrome can do a lot for society and for themselves, and it is necessary to develop awareness of them and their possibilities.

I believe in supporting these people because they are great people who can do a lot.
I believe that colors are a symbol of freedom, creativity and individuality.
I believe that children with Down syndrome are full of true colors and that is why I love them.

Through the social networks Facebook and Instagram, you can follow all our activities, as well as the support we give to people with Down syndrome.

Founder of 21Socks

Adi Sarajlić

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